Important News

Psychology in the Sixth Form

 A Level Psychology

Psychopathology involves the detailed study of a mental disorder. Psychology is about people and animals - how they think, how they act, react and interact.  It is concerned with all aspects of behaviour and the thoughts, feelings and motivations underlying such behaviour. 

Psychology is fascinating and has everyday applications. It requires students to develop their own explanations of human behaviour, whilst accepting that other viewpoints are equally valid.

It would be a good idea to listen to TV and radio programmes that deal with scientific and medical issues. Always think about where the evidence comes from, who collected it, why, and what use is going to be made of the information. Read widely about current ethical issues regarding the way scientists conduct their research and its implications for the subjects, general public and practitioners in medical and related professions.

Students with high grades in English, maths and science generally find it easier to manage the extensive reading required and cope well with the level of scientific and mathematical skills required. Focus on achieving the best possible results in these subjects.

Many students find the subject matter interesting.  It provokes thought and lively discussion.  We know that it is a demanding course.  For students who are prepared for hard work, and who have a genuine interest in human behaviour, it is an enjoyable course. Psychology complements almost any other subject and as an accepted science subject, allowing students to keep their post 18 options open.

What is the course about?

We follow the Eduqas curriculum. In Year 1, students will develop a broad knowledge and  
understanding of the core areas of psychology.

Unit 1: A broad range of approaches will be covered, such as Behaviourism, Biological, Cognitive and Psychoanalytical.

Unit 2: This unit features research methods, including a coursework module.

In Year 2 (Unit 2 continued and Unit 3), the specification offers a range of topic-based options which bring together explanations from different psychological approaches and engage students in issues and debates in psychology. These will include Stress, Autism, Psychopathology and Forensic Psychology. Further topics to be covered include advanced research methods and ethics. 

Three exams will be sat at the end of the two year course.

What sort of work will I be doing?
Psychology is about people and animals - how they think, how they act, react and interact. It is concerned with all aspects of behavior and the thoughts, feelings and motivations underlying such behaviour. During the course you will be:
 
  • learning about the theories of psychologists and the language they use to explain and discuss ideas
  • researching the nature of psychological evidence and the methods that psychologists use to analyse and evaluate it
  • developing an understanding of simple statistical techniques and applying them to measuring and
  • understanding human behaviour
  • planning and carrying out psychological investigations related to a course topic
  • developing skills of critical analysis and evaluation of theories and their relation to human behaviour.
How will I be assessed?
You will be assessed every two weeks. This assessment will take various forms, such as class tests, assignments, presentations and mock exams. For all assessments (except for PPEs) a minimum grade “B” is required.
What qualifications are needed to take this course?
You will need 5 GCSE passes at grades 4, including a grade 4/5 in English, Mathematics and Science. In addition you will need an average GCSE point score of at least 5.2.
 
Students should be comfortable with writing essays and have an interest in science. Students with strong grades in essay based subjects like History, RE and Sociology are more likely to succeed.  Students need to be able to review and devise practical work following the scientific method and therefore need an enquiring mind.
What extra work can I do?
Psychology is fascinating and has everyday applications.  It requires students to develop their own explanations of human behaviour, whilst accepting that other viewpoints are equally valid. It would be a good idea to listen to TV and radio programmes that deal with scientific and medical issues. Always think about where the evidence comes from, who collected it, why, and what use is going to be made of the information. Read widely about current ethical issues regarding the way scientists conduct their research and its implications for the subjects, general public and practitioners in medical and related professions.
 
Students with high grades in English, maths and science generally find it easier to manage the extensive reading required and cope well with the level of scientific and mathematical skills required. Focus on achieving the best possible results in these subjects.
 
Many students find the subject matter interesting. It provokes thought and lively discussion. We know that it is a demanding course. For students who are prepared for hard work, and who have a genuine interest in human behaviour, it is an enjoyable course. Psychology complements almost any other subject and as an accepted science subject, allowing students to keep their post 18 options open.
 
Studying Psychology can lead to a wide range of career and higher education opportunities. The skills gained are valued by employers, universities and colleges. There is a wide range of psychology degree courses available; clinical, child, educational, occupational,  forensic, counselling, sports and health, in addition to combined courses with many other subjects.
 





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