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History in the Sixth Form

 A Level History

This course will appeal to students who have an interest in the way the world has developed through the ages and those who enjoy investigation and discovery. It is important that you have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in politics and current affairs, a desire to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. The minimum requirements to do this A level are 5 grade 4s/Cs in 5 different subjects. You should preferably have 6 in GCSE History and a Grade 5 in English Language.

Students who study A-level History, have access to a wide range of career and higher education opportunities.  By the end of the course you will have learned to evaluate and analyse information, work independently, weigh up evidence and communicate complex ideas effectively. All these skills are recognised and valued by employers, universities and colleges. History provides a basis for a number of popular careers including journalism, law and business. 

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

This course will appeal to students who have an interest in the way the world has developed through the ages and those who enjoy investigation and discovery. It is important that you have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in politics and current affairs, a desire to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. 

What will I learn on this course?

Students who take this course will:

  • Gain an insight into present situations by studying the past, learning about the significance of events and individuals.
  • Understand issues and societies in the past and how ideas, attitudes and values have changed over time.
  • Learn to analyse and evaluate historical sources critically.
  • Develop the ability to express your own historical ideas confidently and effectively
  • Acquire the skills required to present an analytical argument with relevance and coherence.
What kind of student is this course suitable for?

This course will appeal to those students who:

  • Enjoy debate and discussion and have an interest in the past and how it has shaped the development of the modern world
  • Value opportunities to work independently
  • Seek to improve their skills at analysing information and learn how to weigh up evidence before making a conclusion
  • Wish to study a subject which is highly regarded as a useful qualification for a wide range of higher education and career choices
  • Want to keep their options open and wish to develop the kinds of skills and understanding that are highly valued by employers in law, journalism, politics, the media, civil service, commerce and social work.
  • Are looking for a subject which combines well with other subjects including Mathematics, Science, English and foreign languages as well as other humanities subjects; if you are thinking about these subjects then consider History.
What is the course content and how is it assessed?

Unit 1 – British period study: England 1485-1558 – The early Tudors

Students will begin by investigating the government and foreign policy of Henry VII.  They will then go on to study the reign of Henry VIII and the role of Wolsey.  Students will also consider the process of religious change and opposition after 1529.  As part of this unit of work, students will also complete a depth enquiry of a mid-Tudor crisis between 1547-1558, focusing on the stability of the monarchy, religious change or rebellion and unrest.

Unit 2 – Non-British period study: Russia 1894-1941

Students will study modern Russian history from 1881 to 1941.  They will study three revolutions, the fall of Russia’s last emperor and the creation of the world’s first Communist state.  This is then followed by a study of Stalin’s rise to power and the impact of his policies on the Russian people.

Unit 3 – Thematic study: Civil Rights in the USA 1865-1992

In this unit, students will study four key civil rights movements in the USA: African Americans, Native American Indians, the Trade Union movement and the Women’s Rights movement.  As part of their study, they will investigate a range of interpretations on the degree of progress made during 1875-1895, the impact of the New Deal and the impact of Malcolm X and the Black Power movement.

Unit 4 –Topic-based essay

In this coursework unit, students will carry out an independent enquiry related to one of the areas of study they have undertaken.  They will demonstrate their skill at working with contemporary evidence and produce an essay of 3,000-4,000 words in length.  This will contribute 20% of the final A Level grade. 

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

Students who study A-level History, have access to a wide range of career and higher education opportunities. By the end of the course you will have learned to evaluate and analyse information, work independently, weigh up evidence and communicate complex ideas effectively. All these skills are recognised and valued by employers, universities and colleges. History provides a basis for a number of popular careers including journalism, law and business.

Student Profile

"History is an exciting and enjoyable subject to study" – Jessika

"History provides you with the key skills that you can use in all subjects, as well as being interesting and thoroughly enjoyable!"

"Everyone smiles in History".





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